The Town of Senafe and the surrounding villages are completely devastated by the tragedy of the Mediterranean Sea after overcrowded boats were mysteriously sunk as a result of which 400 Eritreans are believed to have drowned. Sources from the capital of Eritrea, Asmara, indicated that so far, close to 90 families have received the worst news, setting the whole community of the region in mourning. Similarly, Adi Keyih and its vicinity has become another region which has lost many dear sons and daughters.

The Town of Senafe and the surrounding villages are completely devastated by the tragedy of the Mediterranean Sea after overcrowded boats were mysteriously sunk as a result of which 400 Eritreans are believed to have drowned. Sources from the capital of Eritrea, Asmara, indicated that so far, close to 90 families have received the worst news, setting the whole community of the region in mourning. Similarly, Adi Keyih and its vicinity has become another region which has lost many dear sons and daughters.

It is rare that a country's entire condition can be summarised in a single word. That is true of Eritrea today, however; and the word is tragic. There are many indices of this tragedy, among them Eritrea's appalling record in hunger, poverty, human rights and freedom of the press. But the most painful is that of stolen promise. Eritrea's people fought so hard and succeeded in so much that was deemed impossible, only for their achievement to be snatched away from them. Today, Eritreans both inside and outside their Horn of Africa homeland are living with the consequences, and trying to understand why their nation's history took such a cruel twist. The answer, for very many of us, lies in the political character of one man: Eritrea's president, Isaias Afewerki.

It is rare that a country's entire condition can be summarised in a single word. That is true of Eritrea today, however; and the word is tragic. There are many indices of this tragedy, among them Eritrea's appalling record in hunger, poverty, human rights and freedom of the press. But the most painful is that of stolen promise. Eritrea's people fought so hard and succeeded in so much that was deemed impossible, only for their achievement to be snatched away from them. Today, Eritreans both inside and outside their Horn of Africa homeland are living with the consequences, and trying to understand why their nation's history took such a cruel twist. The answer, for very many of us, lies in the political character of one man: Eritrea's president, Isaias Afewerki.