Sweden’s ambassador to Eritrea tells the Government that it is ok to extradite a Save man who has escaped military service in Eritrea, despite reports that deserters are tortured and killed in Eritrea, Swedish Radio reports.

Sweden’s ambassador to Eritrea tells the Government that it is ok to extradite a Save man who has escaped military service in Eritrea, despite reports that deserters are tortured and killed in Eritrea, Swedish Radio reports.

UK-based lawyer Mihret Goitom tells how her sister-in-law’s attempt to escape Eritrea and join her husband ended in tragedy, after she and her children were incarcerated in a refugee camp in Sudan en-route.

In 2000, my brother, who had married in 1993 and had three children, left Eritrea alone. He left to study journalism in another African country, and he was fully aware that returning to Eritrea would be problematic.

UK-based lawyer Mihret Goitom tells how her sister-in-law’s attempt to escape Eritrea and join her husband ended in tragedy, after she and her children were incarcerated in a refugee camp in Sudan en-route.

In 2000, my brother, who had married in 1993 and had three children, left Eritrea alone. He left to study journalism in another African country, and he was fully aware that returning to Eritrea would be problematic.

It was a question worth killing over, in the minds of some Somali Islamic extremists. In May, Ahmed Omar Hashi, a reporter for Mogadishu’s Radio Shabelle asked Eritrean President Isaias Afwerki to explain his country’s support for al-Shabab, the hardline Somali Islamic group. Afwerki explained that Eritrea only wanted to enable “Somali nationalists” in their efforts at “ensuring Somali unity, sovereignty and independence.”…President Afwerki’s reply to Hashi was a softball answer to a softball question. But that didn’t matter to the Mogadishu-based Islamic extremists, who later called Hashi on his cell phone, accusing him of spreading lies about al-Shabab, and threatening to kill him.

It was a question worth killing over, in the minds of some Somali Islamic extremists. In May, Ahmed Omar Hashi, a reporter for Mogadishu’s Radio Shabelle asked Eritrean President Isaias Afwerki to explain his country’s support for al-Shabab, the hardline Somali Islamic group. Afwerki explained that Eritrea only wanted to enable “Somali nationalists” in their efforts at “ensuring Somali unity, sovereignty and independence.”…President Afwerki’s reply to Hashi was a softball answer to a softball question. But that didn’t matter to the Mogadishu-based Islamic extremists, who later called Hashi on his cell phone, accusing him of spreading lies about al-Shabab, and threatening to kill him.

It is rare that a country's entire condition can be summarised in a single word. That is true of Eritrea today, however; and the word is tragic. There are many indices of this tragedy, among them Eritrea's appalling record in hunger, poverty, human rights and freedom of the press. But the most painful is that of stolen promise. Eritrea's people fought so hard and succeeded in so much that was deemed impossible, only for their achievement to be snatched away from them. Today, Eritreans both inside and outside their Horn of Africa homeland are living with the consequences, and trying to understand why their nation's history took such a cruel twist. The answer, for very many of us, lies in the political character of one man: Eritrea's president, Isaias Afewerki.

It is rare that a country's entire condition can be summarised in a single word. That is true of Eritrea today, however; and the word is tragic. There are many indices of this tragedy, among them Eritrea's appalling record in hunger, poverty, human rights and freedom of the press. But the most painful is that of stolen promise. Eritrea's people fought so hard and succeeded in so much that was deemed impossible, only for their achievement to be snatched away from them. Today, Eritreans both inside and outside their Horn of Africa homeland are living with the consequences, and trying to understand why their nation's history took such a cruel twist. The answer, for very many of us, lies in the political character of one man: Eritrea's president, Isaias Afewerki.

ahmed

MOGADISHU (AFP) — Somalia's President Sharif Sheikh Ahmed on Wednesday accused Eritrea of arming hardline Islamists fighting to oust his government, a day after his own palace came under a barrage of mortar shells. It was the first time he directly blamed the small African nation since the eruption early this month of some of the heaviest fighting against his four-months-old government.

ahmed

MOGADISHU (AFP) — Somalia's President Sharif Sheikh Ahmed on Wednesday accused Eritrea of arming hardline Islamists fighting to oust his government, a day after his own palace came under a barrage of mortar shells. It was the first time he directly blamed the small African nation since the eruption early this month of some of the heaviest fighting against his four-months-old government.

AU

The Africa Union (AU) says it stands by its recommendation to the United Nations Security Council to impose sanctions on Eritrea despite Asamara's sharp denial. The AU said public pronouncement by Sheik Dahir Aweys, a Somali opposition leader that his insurgent group receives help from Eritrea supports its suspicion of Asamara.

AU

The Africa Union (AU) says it stands by its recommendation to the United Nations Security Council to impose sanctions on Eritrea despite Asamara's sharp denial. The AU said public pronouncement by Sheik Dahir Aweys, a Somali opposition leader that his insurgent group receives help from Eritrea supports its suspicion of Asamara.

In the TV interview conducted by a Swedish journalist Donald Boström, Isaias says that everything in the world, including policies in Africa, Swedish political system, media and free speech at local and global levels, elections, …literally everything is controlled by special interests in Washington and

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In the TV interview conducted by a Swedish journalist Donald Boström, Isaias says that everything in the world, including policies in Africa, Swedish political system, media and free speech at local and global levels, elections, …literally everything is controlled by special interests in Washington and

READ MORE